21 Days of Meditation and the Podcast launch!

Hey Everyone!

I’ve got two big announcements to make!

The podcast that I host, the Sivana Podcast, is finally launching tomorrow!  I will have details up once we launch, but for now you can check out our Soundcloud page (https://soundcloud.com/sivanapodcast) which does have Episode 0 up!

Also, my new online course, Transform Your Life with 21 Days of Meditation, will be launching soon. Guided meditations, breathing practices, video and audio tracks, plans for the busy yogi in the world finding their time to meditate between work and responsibilities, as well as those who are ready to dive in and commit to a complete immersion for 21 days!

If you want to be the first to know about the official launch date and get a special discount code for the course, I recommend signing up for my newsletter! Sign up here: 

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Updated: March 28, 2016 — 11:27 am

2 Comments

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  1. Hi Ashton:
    I listened to a couple podcasts and enjoyed them. A question for you: in your talk about Ganesh (sp?), you described a state where wicked people were getting into heaven through a kind of formalism, and that Ganesh was created to fix this unfairness by setting obstacles. i don’t think you connected the remedy with the quality of virtue in the people who lived the authentic lives. Are they not sinners, or does Hinduism have a different concept of sin?
    Thanks.
    Tom

    1. Hi Tom!

      I think that’s a really great observation. I think virtue also plays a large role in the story. Given the emphasis of the three part mini-series, I chose to focus a little more on one’s purpose and the temptations of wealth and success, but absolutely we can have the conversation also tie into a conversation about a virtue. I think a big part of story telling is choosing a particular path/emphasis and going with it. The story (any story really) definitely can have multiple (and multi-layered) interpretations though.

      As far as heaven/hell, sin, etc… I think you would find quite a variance throughout Hinduism in terms of the specific beliefs. I’d say, as a whole, a Hindu would view heaven, hell, and sin much differently then someone coming from a Judeo-Christian background. In the story, I used the terms as a means of cultivating familiarity (since most of our audience is in the west and less likely to be Hindu) with ideas, to make it more understandable and accessible to a western mind more familiar with Judeo-Christian concepts.

      Most Hindu’s believe in reincarnation, so concepts of heaven/hell/sin can take on a role more of a living experience in the here and now. Is life a living hell for you, or a living heaven? What is your experience of moment to moment reality? Sin is also viewed much less about punishment from an external force, but rather about basic moral principles of interacting with people and the world around you.

      Thanks for reaching out!

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